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updated: 938 PM EDT Mon May 22 2017
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North Jersey Events

Tuesday
May 23, 2017
Butler, New Jersey
Thursday
May 25, 2017
Butler, New Jersey
Saturday
May 27, 2017
Ringwood, New Jersey
Saturday
May 27, 2017
West Milford, New Jersey
Sunday
May 28, 2017
Butler, New Jersey
Sunday
May 28, 2017
West Milford, New Jersey
Tuesday
May 30, 2017
Butler, New Jersey
Thursday
June 1, 2017
Madison, New Jersey
Saturday
June 3, 2017
Oxford, New Jersey
Saturday
June 3, 2017
West Milford, New Jersey
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Forsynthia blooms in West Milford, NJ

Forsynthia blooms herald springtime in West Milford, NJ - April 12, 2017   MORE PICTURES!

See more about Long Pond Ironworks!  For more pictures of common North Jersey Bird feeder visitors go to our Bird page. Check out our new rt23 Staff Walkabout photo journals for Great Falls pictures and more on our scenery page!

COMMISSIONER MARTIN LIFTS DROUGHT WARNING AND WATCH ADVISORIES FOR MOST OF NEW JERSEY

WISE WATER USE ENCOURAGED AS LAWN AND GARDENING SEASON BEGINS

April 12, 2017 - (17/P32) TRENTON - Following months of sufficient precipitation, Department of Environmental Protection Commissioner Bob Martin today lifted a drought warning for 12 of 14 counties in the northern, central and northern coastal regions of New Jersey and removed a drought watch for four counties in the southwestern part of the state.

Commissioner Martin signed an Administrative Order removing, Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Morris, Ocean, Passaic, Sussex, Union and Warren counties from drought warning status and removing Burlington, Camden, Gloucester and Salem counties from drought watch. These advisories had been in place since October.

Round Valley and Spruce Run reservoirs in central New Jersey both remain below normal capacity. Round Valley is at about 72 percent capacity and Spruce Run is at about 69 capacity, due in large part to less precipitation in this area over the winter.

As a result, Hunterdon County and Somerset County, which are primarily served by these reservoirs, will remain under a drought warning. This allows for continued modified passing flows designed to conserve storage.

"The return of soaking and well-timed precipitation over the winter and early spring has resulted in steady improvements in our drought indicators for most of the state," Commissioner Martin said. "In particular, storage levels in the major reservoir systems that serve the densely populated portions of northern New Jersey are at full capacity entering the time of year when water demand peaks."

"Water levels are increasing across the state in response to recent rains," said State Geologist Jeffrey L. Hoffman. "Reservoirs, with the exception of Round Valley and Spruce Run, are more than 90 percent full. Stream flows and groundwater levels are trending upward, which is a good sign. We will continue to closely monitor indicators in all parts of the state."

The Round Valley and Spruce Run reservoirs, operated by the New Jersey Water Supply Authority, is typically at 94 percent this time of year.

"By maintaining the reduced passing flow requirement, the authority would expect to save anywhere between seven to ten billion gallons in the reservoirs over the upcoming summer months, which will allow the reservoirs to continue to improve," said Beth Gates, executive director for the authority.

While most regions of the state are now under normal water supply conditions, Commissioner Martin reminds the public to always practice water conservation, especially when watering lawns and landscaping, which accounts for a significant portion of water use in the spring and summer.

"I want to thank water suppliers and residents in the affected areas of the state for working with us to conserve water," Commissioner Martin said. "I urge everyone to always be mindful of not wasting water. We should not forget the images from last fall of the muddy slopes of receding reservoirs as we turn our attention to maintaining our lawns and landscaping this spring."

Some suggested lawn and garden water conservation tips include:
* Do not over-water lawns and landscaping. Two times per week for 30 minutes in the morning or late afternoon during drier periods is typically sufficient.
* Use a hose with a hand-nozzle to water flowers and shrubs.
* Do not mow your grass too short. Set mowing height to at least three inches. Longer grass blades help retain soil moisture, improve root growth and encourage a healthier lawn.
* Avoid watering lawns and plants during the heat of the day, since much of this water will evaporate without helping your lawn.
* Reduce the size of your lawn by establishing gardens that use native, drought-tolerant vegetation.
* Apply mulch around shrubs and flower beds to reduce evaporation, promote plant growth and reduce weeds.
* Use barrels or other containers to capture rainfall for use in watering. Cover the openings with fine screens to prevent mosquitoes from laying eggs in the collected water.
* Use a broom to sweep sidewalks and driveways rather than a hose.

To save water in the home:
* Fix leaky faucets and pipes.
* Turn off the faucet while shaving and brushing teeth.
* Install faucet aerators.
* Run washing machines and dishwashers when full, or make sure to select the appropriate wash cycle for the load size.
* Take shorter showers.
* Install a low-flow toilet.

More news...

 


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Dining in Northern New Jersey North Jersey Restaurant Guide
Find some new places for dining and entertainment in Northern New Jersey!! Indian? French? Thai? Italian cuisine? North Jersey has it all! Click Here!


pan roasted chicken breast at Alices
Pan roasted chicken breast with grilled asparagus and impasta polents

Teres major
Teres Major with root vegetables and garlic poatoes
Alice's

Alice's restaurant offers beautiful views of the lake and boardwalk at Lake Hopatcong.  Their "New-American Cuisine" menu has a great selection of steak and seafood, but also includes vegan and vegetarian fare as well as "gluten free". 

Alice's is located on historic Nolan's Point Park Road along Lake Hopatcong.  Alice's celebrates lake living with a comfortable reclaimed barn wood dining room and a glass enclosed porch with spectacular lake views.

Their staff is attentive and polite. Seasonal menus created by chef Joseph Sanfilippo feature New-American style items using the freshest seasonal ingredients, every dish is "made to order". Owners Alice and her husband have over 30 years of hospitality experience, Alice's being one of five of their Lake Hopatcong businesses.


Alice's
24 Nolan's Point Road
Lake Hopatcong, New Jersey
phone 973-663-9600



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At rt23.com, we highlight the uniqueness of Northern New Jersey with articles on its scenic beauty, recreational opportunities and history.
The rt23.com research team is out and about finding items of interest to both long time residents and visitors. We have our pads, pencils and cameras to make a record of this scenic part of America.

The state of New Jersey has an undeserved reputation of being completely covered with big cities and big industry. We'd like to change this perception by introducing one of the least known and most beautiful parts of America. Forty percent of New Jersey is forest and woodland. An additional twenty-one percent is fruit, dairy and vegetable farms.

Rt23.com is named for North Jersey's highway Route 23 which begins at a city intersection in Verona, N.J. and ends near the Delaware River National Recreation Area. Join us as we explore the region where America begins!

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